Writing Tip of the Day

Writing Tip of the Day

“Plan each task and each day.  Often projects can appear insurmountable until you break them down into individual tasks and prioritize them.  The same applies to your day.  There’s always so much to do, but what do you do first?

“Start each day with a “to do” list.  Prioritize the most important tasks for the day and, if they are not completed, transfer them to the next day’s list with an appropriate priority rating.  In addition to a daily plan, keep weekly and monthly plans for longer-term or larger projects.  Each week, review the list and transfer tasks to your daily lists, as required.”

Source: Writer’s Digest

Writing Tip of the Day

Writing Tip of the Day

Being a writer is about the writing, not the end result of writing. Pretty much every published author I know dreads events such as book tours and agent/editor meetings. Focus on the process of being a writer, not the trappings of being a writer. The reality is not all it appears to be. Do not try to take shortcuts to getting published or to misrepresent yourself or to cheat. One thing to remember about getting published in any format: The printed word is out there for anyone to see and double-check, so any shortcuts taken will come back to haunt you.

Being a writer is about creating, through words, a construct that comes alive in readers’ minds. Yet the reader is always separate from the writer. Therefore, the writer has to be satisfied with sitting alone 99 percent of the time with just the creating.

Source: Writer’s Digest

Writing Tip of the Day

Writing Tip of the Day

Looking for story ideas? Turn to social media for some inspiration. Aside from the links that contacts share over Facebook or Twitter, you can also find an abundance of ideas in the public conversations that people have on Twitter. Writing a novel or a short story? You’ll find some very interesting bits of conversation on the social Web. They can help inspire your characters’ dialogues. Just make sure not to copy them word for word!

“Images” in ClicktheCity.com

What makes a photo tell a good story? What is the difference between a photographer and photojournalist? What is it like to travel around the world to capture the images and the moments that define the world’s history? Learn all these and more from acclaimed photojournalists, Jason Gutierrez and Veejay Villafranca, as they share with us their own stories of capturing history through their lenses.

Jason Gutierrez began his career in news as a correspondent/photographer for the United Press International in 1995, becoming among the last Asian contributors to the American news agency before it closed down its regional coverage two years later.

He joined Agence France-Presse (AFP) in 1997, and has since covered major political upheavals, conflicts, natural disasters and major breaking news in various countries including Cambodia, Indonesia, East Timor, Sri Lanka, Laos, Malaysia and the tribal areas in Pakistan among others.

In 2006, Jason was awarded top prize at the Human Rights Press Awards, Asia’s biggest award ceremony honoring journalists who cover human rights issues, for a story on a paramilitary assassins targeting activists in the Philippines.

Jason has also extensively covered the conflict in southern Mindanao island in his native Philippines, from the birth of the notorious Abu Sayyaf group in the early 1990s to the Moro Islamic Liberation Front’s (MILF) major attacks in 2008 that left more than 700,000 people displaced.

Last year, was among only a handful of journalists allowed to embed with US Marines in their final assault on Marjah, the last stronghold of the Taliban in southern Afghanistan.

As part of his advocacy, Jason also writes and shoots for IRIN, an independent humanitarian news agency operating under the United Nations. He is a former president of the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines (FOCAP), and is at present a member of its board of trustees.

He graduated from the Pamantasan Ng Lungsod Ng Maynila (PLM) in 1995, and was a recipient of the university’s presidential award for excellence, one of only three people to have received the honor in PLM’s 45 year history.

Vicente Jaime “Veejay” Villafranca (b. 1982 Philippines) was amongst seven Filipinos to be accepted in the first Asian documentary workshop of the Angkor photography festival in Siem Reap, Cambodia. After freelancing in 2006, he worked with Agence France Presse, Reuters, World Picture Network and the United Nations IRIN news wire. His project about the lives of former gang members in one of Manila’s dangerous slums, BASECO compound, garnered the 2008 Ian Parry Scholarship grant in London. He is also the recipient of the 2007-2008 Asian Center for Journalism Photojournalism program in partnership with the World Press Photo Foundation. His work has been shown in London, Lithuania, Hongkong, Phnom Pehn, France, Turkey and Manila. Veejay is represented by Getty Global Assignments in London. His ongoing projects evolve around the Filipino faith, the concept of reserved space for ethnic tribes, and illegal refugees in Southeast Asia apart from his project with the gangs.

Source: clickthecity.com

Writing Tip of the Day

How do you get article ideas? Steal them.

How do you get article ideas? Steal them.

This is what Linda Formichelli says in this post on WritersDigest.com.
Here, she offers six brain-saving ideas for pitching those precious pieces.

1. “Nick from newspapers”
“Many women’s magazines run profiles of women who contribute to their communities by volunteering, creating nonprofit organizations and so on. These feel-good, low-key pieces are a staple for local papers,” Formichelli writes.

2. “Mooch from magazines”
“You wouldn’t want to take an article idea in its entirety and pitch it to the magazine’s competitor—that’s just bad form. But no one says you can’t slant an idea you found and sell it to a magazine in a different market.”

Our own tip here: don’t just find a different slant to an already-published piece; do in-depth research and do a follow-up story, especially if it’s about an ongoing topic or one that many readers are interested in. This tip would be great for current events stories.

3. “Pilfer from press releases”
We tend to agree with Formichelli here: “The press release’s entire raison d’être is to persuade writers to write about the product or service advertised therein—so feel free to steal, swipe and snatch with abandon.” Just remember never, ever to plagiarize.

4. “Grab from government reports”
“The government churns out an enormous quantity of written materials—reports, newsletters, advisories and more,” Formichelli writes. “These can be great sources of inspiration for writers.” Our tips: check out the websites www.gov.phwww.senate.gov.phwww.congress.gov.ph, and www.pia.gov.ph.

5. “Burgle from books”
Formichelli says: “If you write about personal development, the self-help section of the bookstore is a potential gold mine. Write about parenting? Check out the childcare section. And for nutrition nuts, the shelves are overflowing with books about new diets…

“Magazine editors love ideas that are made timely by the publication of a new book, and, as a bonus, you can interview the books’ authors as expert sources.”

We say: It’s not only from books that you can borrow ideas. Check out other websites and blogs, information that you find in the social networks, or even news reports and movies. Anything can be fodder for writing if you just sharpen your senses.

6. “Swipe from yourself”
Lastly, Formichelli challenges us to never throw old ideas away. “You know all those articles and queries you wrote that have languished on your hard drive for years? Pull a Dr. Frankenstein and bring them back to life. You put a lot of effort into researching those topics, so you should get as much mileage out of them as possible.” And why not? Who knows? That old pitch you have in an old notebook might finally have found the right time to come out.

Read the rest of Linda Formichelli’s post HERE: http://www.writersdigest.com/article/Thou_Shalt_Steal/

Writing Tip of the Day

Writing Tip of the Day

Write what you know; write what you know intuitively; write what you would like to know; write in order to know; write so that the reader may know.

~ Alan Ziegler, The Writing Workshop Note Book: Notes on Creating and Workshopping (Soft Skull Press, 2008)