Writing Tip of the Day

Affect Vs. Effect

Affect and effect are two words that are commonly confused.

 

“Affect” is usually a verb meaning “to influence”.

The drug did not affect the disease.

 

“Effect” is usually a noun meaning “result”.

The drug has many adverse side effects.

 

“Effect” can also be used as a verb meaning “to bring about”.

The present government effected many positive changes.

Source: Writer’s Block

Writing Tip of the Day

The Word “Any”

As an adjective, “any” is a useful, but overused, intensifier. Reserve it for situations when the meanings of one at random, one indiscriminately, an indeterminate number or quantity, or lack of restriction are truly vital to the meaning of a sentence.

Consider these typical examples found in technical writing:

If any text is selected when you click <command>, the Format dialog opens.

Any file can be printed using the Print dialog.

 

In Sentence 1, the “any” is clearly unnecessary. Something happens when text is selected. That the amount of text is determinate or indeterminate is beside the point. Drop the “any”.

In Sentence 2, on the other hand, the “any” is clearly vital. Every file, without restriction (as to size, format, etc.), can be printed. Keep the “any”.

Source: Writer’s Block

Writing Tip of the Day

Prepositions: “Since” and “Because”

The preposition since is often incorrectly used in place of the preposition because in writing. For example:

He gave me half of his sandwich since he could not eat it all.

Since is a preposition of time that indicates the beginning point of an action. The action can be either continuous or one that has happened at one time or another within the period.

She’s been travelling to Florida every winter since 1985.

Because is used to introduce the idea of cause or reason for an action. The correct formulation of the first sentence should read:

He gave me half of his sandwich because he could not eat it all.

Source: Writings Block

 

UNESCO Essay Competition: Energy for Sustainable Development in Asia

Deadline: 31 April 2011

Completing the “Energy for sustainable development in Asia” e-learning program, UNESCO Jakarta together with Sustainable Energy and Environment (SEE) Forum invite participants to share their perspectives in an essay competition.

The content of essay should address specific issues below:

* Status of your country’s nuclear power development including a national plan to introduce nuclear power.
* Your opinion about the status
* If, in your opinion, nuclear power is not an option for your country or has to be phased out, how do you map out your country’s energy mix and what kind of policy tools you would like to introduce?

UNESCO and SEE Forum will judge the essay on the basis of originality and creativity of thought, structure and coherence of arguments and relevance to the essay’s theme.

The English-language essay should use Times New Roman font with size of 12, 1.5 line spacing and maximum up to 5 pages A4 size.

Three (3) winners will be selected and invited to participate on 3 days – SEE Forum meeting: Clean Energy and Technology – Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in June 2011 or A Paradigm Shift to Low Carbon Society – Bangkok, Thailand in November 2011. Ticket and accommodation will be covered by UNESCO Jakarta and SEE Forum.

Essay must be submitted to as.wulan@unesco.org and cc to e.prasetyo@unesco.org before 30/04/2011. Include your personal details (name, university, affiliation, phone no, email) in your submission. Result will be announced the latest at 31/05/2011.

Via: connect-asia.org

Contact Information:

For inquiries: as.wulan@unesco.org

For submissions: as.wulan@unesco.org and cc to e.prasetyo@unesco.org

Website: http://www.connect-asia.org

 

Read original post at AsiaWrites

Writing Tip of the Day

“Like” and “Such As”

Like” Excludes
A like comparison typically names only one person or thing in the comparison class, and excludes that person or thing from the group being discussed. For example:

When a team has a goalie like Dominik Hasek, it might continue to win despite having slightly weaker defensive players.
This comparison talks speculatively about hockey teams whose goalies have abilities similar to Hasek’s. The Buffalo Sabres and Hasek are specifically excluded as members of the group under discussion, because only teams that have goalies “like Hasek” are included.

“Such As” Includes
A such as comparison can name one or several persons or things in the comparison class, but it typically includes those persons or things in the group being discussed. For example:

When hockey commentators such as Roy MacGregor or Don Cherry make controversial remarks, the buzz at the water cooler the next morning is louder than usual.

This comparison talks about hockey commentators as a class whose members include Roy MacGregor (print) and Don Cherry (television). The buzz around the water cooler increases whenever one of those particular men or other commentators in their class say something controversial.

Like” Excludes
A like comparison typically names only one person or thing in the comparison class, and excludes that person or thing from the group being discussed. For example:
When a team has a goalie like Dominik Hasek, it might continue to win despite having slightly weaker defensive players.
This comparison talks speculatively about hockey teams whose goalies have abilities similar to Hasek’s. The Buffalo Sabres and Hasek are specifically excluded as members of the group under discussion, because only teams that have goalies “like Hasek” are included.

“Such As” Includes
A such as comparison can name one or several persons or things in the comparison class, but it typically includes those persons or things in the group being discussed. For example:

When hockey commentators such as Roy MacGregor or Don Cherry make controversial remarks, the buzz at the water cooler the next morning is louder than usual.

This comparison talks about hockey commentators as a class whose members include Roy MacGregor (print) and Don Cherry (television). The buzz around the water cooler increases whenever one of those particular men or other commentators in their class say something controversial.

How did Shakespeare deal with writer’s block?

There is, perhaps, no better-known playwright in the whole world than William Shakespeare–and we bet he’s had his off days, too. In this humorous take on Shakespeare and the dreaded writer’s block, filmmaker Anna Cohen gives us a sneak peek of how he must have come up with the tragic, heartbreaking scenes behind Romeo & Juliet.

There is, perhaps, no better-known playwright in the whole world than William Shakespeare–and we bet he’s had his off days, too. In this humorous take on Shakespeare and the dreaded writer’s block, filmmaker Anna Cohen gives us a sneak peek of how he must have come up with the tragic, heartbreaking scenes behind Romeo & Juliet.

 

Thanks to BrainPickings.org for curating this great post!