Writing Tip of the Day

Past History

Past History

We can find a comparable situation with “past history” andpast experience.” Again, when taken in the opposite direction, time-wise, a modifier would be helpful: “We here at Granite Airlines hope your future experience with us will be far more enjoyable. And we do hope that nasty stain comes out of your suit.” Similarly, one need not prepare ahead of time. To prepare is sufficient.

Source: Grammar Girl

Networking Night: Unleashing Your Creativity (TUESDAY, May 31, 6:30 PM onwards!)

Mingle with editors and writers as you tap into your creative side. Be inspired as magazine editors, Bianca Consunji of Metro and Patricia Tumang of Vault, share their stories and tips on how to get your creativity going.

MAY 31 | TUESDAY | 6:30PM

Good Spirits at The Collective, Malugay St., Makati City
Entrance: P150 for members; P250 for non-members (inclusive of snack & drink)

To reserve, email writersblock.ph@gmail.com or contact 0927 8508280.

Writer's Block Philippines Networking Night Unleashing Your Creativity

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Writing Tip of the Day

Don’t over write

Don’t over write

This is a symptom of having too little to say or too much ego.

Put your reader first. Put yourself in the background. Focus on the message.

 

For example:

 

You can instantly and dramatically improve your blog writing skills and immediately explode your profits and skyrocket your online success by following the spectacular, simple, and practical tips found in this groundbreaking new free blog post.

Source: Copy Blogger

Writing Tip of the Day

could of, would of, should of

Could of, Would of, Should of

 

Please don’t do this:

I should of gone to the baseball game, and I could of, if Billy would of done his job.

 

This is correct:

 

I should have gone to the baseball game, and could have, if Billy had done his job.

 

Why do people make this mistake?

 

They could’veshould’vewould’ve been correct, except that the ending of those contractions is slurred when spoken. This creates something similar to a homophone, i.e., a word that is pronounced the same as another word but differs in meaning, e.g., of, which results in the common grammatical mistake of substituting of for have.

Source: Copy Blogger

 

Writing Tip of the Day

Earlier and Later

Earlier and Later

There’s a particular construction that frequently makes its way into even the best news writing, as well as into press releases and other corporate communications: “later this week,” “earlier this year” and the like. Here’s how and why the “later” and “earlier” are redundant. Consider this sentence: “I’ll get back to you later this week.” Well, it has to be later this week; it’s in the future. “Later” is implicit. It’s sufficient, when discussing an upcoming event, to say, “I’ll get back to you this week.”

The same goes for this sentence, dealing with a past event: “She went to Marrakesh earlier this year.”

An exception would be when striking a contrast between two events and the relative chronology is important. Here’s an example: “The senator said in June that he supported the railroad project. Earlier this year, he opposed the project.”

Source: Grammar Girl

Writing Tip of the Day

Separate Writing and Editing

Separate writing and editing

Writing comes first, then editing. If you try to combine the two, you will block.

Writing should come as easily to you as chatting to a friend. If it doesn’t, you’re trying to edit in your head before you get the words on paper, or on the computer screen. If you’re not aware of the danger of combining writing and editing, you’ll make writing hard for yourself, when it should be easy. If you don’t have trouble talking, how can you have trouble writing?

~ Angela Booth