FAQs: Dreamboarding Workshop on July 21, 2012

What are the general details of the workshop?

What:             Dreamboarding: A workshop on creative visualization

When:             July 21 (Saturday), 1:00-4:00PM

Where:           The Forum, Fully Booked, Bonifacio Global City, Taguig

Fee:                 P1,200, inclusive of materials

What is a dreamboard?

A dreamboard, also called a “vision board”, is a collage of images that are meant to creatively visualize and connect you to your life goals. Some people like creating digital versions of their dreamboards, but we recommend the “analog” cut-and-paste version to allow serendipity to fully work its magic into the process. 

What exactly is a “Dreamboarding” workshop?

“Dreamboarding” is a three-hour creativity session where participants will be asked to take part in a visualization exercise, make their own dreamboards, and process the contents of their dreamboards to better understand their goals, priorities, and motivations. There are no right or wrong answers, and nobody will be forced to share details that they wish to keep to themselves.

 Is the “Dreamboarding” workshop only for writers?

The “Dreamboarding” workshop is open to writers and non-writers alike, both young and old. Even teenagers may attend the event!

 How many are the expected participants?

 We can only accommodate a maximum of 20 participants for this event.

 How I can benefit from the activity?

 At the very least, making a dreamboard can help you visualize your goals. (And what you can visualize, you can more easily achieve!) On a deeper level, the regular practice of dreamboarding can help you better see underlying patterns in your life, understand your priorities and motivations, and be more inspired to take charge of your own future.

How much is the registration fee? And what does it cover?

The fee is P1,200, inclusive of workshop materials. (Regular discounts apply for WBP members. Please include your membership card number when emailing us your deposit slip and details.)

How can I reserve and pay for my slot?

Just email us your name and contact details to reserve. To secure your slot to the workshop, you may pay the fee via deposit to our bank account. Details are as follows:

Bank: BPI

Bank account name: Writer’s Block Training Services

Account number: Savings account 1759-0377-11

Once you have made the deposit, please send us a scanned image of the deposit slip to our email address, writersblock.ph@gmail.com. Please also include your full name and mobile number so we can get in touch with you for any urgent communication.

 Will you be accepting walk-ins for this class?

Since we will need to prepare materials before this workshop, we’re afraid that we cannot accept walk-ins. Also, we will have only 20 slots for this workshop, so we encourage you to reserve and make your payments early.

 Is there anything else that I will need to do or bring before the workshop?

Like any other workshop that you may have already attended, the Dreamboarding workshop will only be as effective as you make it. You get what you put into it. That said, the main ingredients for “success” in this workshop are: an open mind and an attitude of genuine learning and sharing. We shall provide the materials that you will use for this exercise, but if you’d like to bring your own magazines and art supplies, feel free to do so.

Who can I contact for more information?

You may reach us at (0927) 850 8280 or email writersblock.ph@gmail.com.

CCP announces the VLF Fellows

The Cultural Center of the Philippines is pleased to announce the ten fellows accepted to the Virgin
Labfest 8 Writing Fellowship Program which will take place on June 26 to July 8, 2012:

1. Maria Kim Magno (University of the Philippines-Diliman)
2. Aliona Silva (University of the Philippines- Diliman)
3. Maria Christina A. Pangan (University of the Philippines-Diliman)
4. Kristen Senajon (Xavier University- Ateneo de Cagayan)
5. Francisco Gian Cabuena (University of Sto. Tomas)
6. Renan Laru-an (University College London)
7. Maria Stephanie Andaya (University of the Philippines-Diliman)
8. Jose Socrates delos Reyes (Ateneo de Manila University)
9. Ferozza Delia Simbulan (University of the Philippines- Manila)
10. Patricia Ruth Cailao (University of the Philippines- Diliman)

The Virgin Labfest 8 Writing Fellowship Program is a two-week mentorship program on the study
and practice of dramatic writing for the stage. This is part of the Festival’s desire to train young
aspiring playwrights. The Fellowship program consists of lectures, script critiquing, writing sessions
and interactions with known playwrights, directors and selected actors. The fellows will also be given
an access pass to all the Virgin Labfest 8 plays and selected rehearsals as part of their mentorship. The
Fellowship Program will conclude in a staged reading of the fellows’ works on July 8, 2012 at the CCP
Bulwagang Amado Hernandez at 6 PM. This culminating activity is open to the public, free of charge.

Other students and guests are also welcome to attend selected sessions of the Fellowship Program for
a fee of P50 per session.

The Virgin Labfest is a highly distinguished annual festival of unpublished, unstaged, untried and
untested works of playwrights, directors and actors. In the past seven years, it has gained its
reputation by producing provocative and outstanding ‘virgin’ plays mostly which have been recognized
by the Palanca Awards for Literature.

For the schedule of sessions open to students and guests, and for further inquiries, kindly email
ccp.artist.training@gmail.com, or call 8321125 local 1605.

Virgin Labfest 8 Writing Fellowship Program–Deadline Extended!

The Cultural Center of the Philippines announces the extension of deadline for submission of applications to the Virgin Labfest 8 Writing Fellowship Program to June 15, 2012. The Fellowship Program will be held from June 26-July 8, 2012.

Consisting of script writing workshop, lectures, discussions and script critiquing, this program is part of the Festival’s desire to train young aspiring playwrights.

To be qualified for the Virgin Labfest 8 Writing Fellowship Program, applicants must be:

1. an enrolled college student;
2. 23 years old or below;
3. able to submit the following:

a. Fully accomplished Application Form (downloadable at the CCP website)

b. 1 (one) to 3(three) sample literary works, either drama or fiction, full or excerpts which should have the following requirements.
• Written either in Filipino, English, Hiligaynon or Kinaray-a.
• Not have been published or produced by a professional theater company.
• Not have won in any national writing competition.
• In .pdf format (12 points, double-spaced, 8” x 11” paper)
• Total number of pages must not exceed 10.
• The real name / identity of the applicant must not be written on any part of the sample works.

All submissions should be sent via email to ccp.artist.training@gmail.com  

All submissions will undergo a pre-screening process. Accepted applicants must be present for the full duration of the two-weeklong fellowship and the culminating showcase.

The 10 applicants accepted to the Virgin Labfest 8 Writing Fellowship Program will be given an all-access pass to this year’s festival plays and selected rehearsals as part of their mentorship. The fellows will also have the opportunity to join the Talkback and Interaction with known playwrights, directors and selected actors. A minimal registration fee of P300 will be required of all accepted applicants.

The Fellowship Program will conclude in a staged reading of the fellow’s works on July 8, 2012 at the CCP Bulwagang Amado Hernandez at 6 PM.

Observers are also welcome to attend selected lectures and discussions, for a fee of P50 per session.

The Virgin Labfest is a highly distinguished annual festival of unpublished, unstaged, untried and untested works of playwrights, directors and actors. In the past seven years, it has gained its reputation by producing provocative and outstanding ‘virgin’ plays mostly which have been recognized by the Palanca Awards for Literature.

Announcement of accepted applicants: June 20, 2012

For other inquiries on the Virgin Labfest 8 Fellowship Program, email ccp.artist.training@gmail.com, or call 832 1125 loc 1605.

 


Recapturing the magic of writing through blogging

BY FAYE DE JESUS

Nine years. That’s how long I’ve been writing about high-voltage lines, transformers, and power utility operations in general.

I do not claim to be an expert in the field, nor do I have grand illusions of becoming an engineer. Memos, letters, press releases, scripts for corporate programs and videos, advertising copies, and reports are fairly easy to write. It is the drafting of speeches and messages that kills me, especially if it involves writing for three different officials attending the same event or commenting on the same issue. I have written motherhood statements and plagiarized MYSELF—yes, myself—so many times, I should be stabbed in the eye with a freshly sharpened pencil.

Corporate writing is just something that I do—day in, day out, Mondays through Fridays, sometimes even on weekends and holidays. I get by mainly because, as nerdy as it sounds, I love researching, learning new things, and interviewing people. Although it’s a job that I eventually learned to enjoy and appreciate, there came a point in my life I felt that I needed to write more aside from technical-slash-electrical stuff.

So I did what everybody else with guts and a working internet connection did—I started blogging.

Last year, a haiku I did not put much thought into writing was randomly picked up and featured in a poetry community blog. I did not find out the exact criteria for my poem ís inclusion, but I did notice that most of those featured were about summer. Ah, there was a theme after all.

I confess: I experimented on poetry writing only because I was bored out of my wits, lovelorn, or both.

For someone like me who a) started blogging for fun, b) couldn’t care less about page views, and c) had no working knowledge of poetry, you know, the rhyming-and-metered, serious kind, the supportive feedback from the poetry community was overwhelming.

Intrigued and stoked, I searched similar sites that offer weekly writing prompts and instant feedback on the works of aspiring writers. It was a completely different world from the kind of written output I have been churning out like a zombie at work. (I sometimes refer to corporate/PR writing as the “pangkabuhayan showcase” type of writing.)

In a major way, blogging and writing poetry sparked my interest in creative writing and romancing words. I received no formal training on this type of writing, but I am emboldened by the fact that so many blogs are out there, and not all of them are great. Do I intend to uplift the quality of writing out there? Itís a noble intention that seduces, but right now, it just feels good to write for leisure and have my voice out there in the worldwide web blackhole.

As I continue blogging, I find that the process of discovering and writing more excites me. It excites me in the same way that power blackouts at work make my heart palpitate. I would love to learn more.

I realized that it is the mindful, zoning-out process of writing that I like. The end-result may not always be great, and I would have my bosses and/or editors to thank for. But still, the mere effort of stringing words and creating something readable and usable to at least one other person on earth makes it all worthwhile.

Ironically, while it excites, writing is also a calming respite from the mayhem of this world. I create my own breathing space on a piece of paper (or a page of MS Word).

For me and the other socially awkward introverts who do not talk much, writing gives the chance to say something and be heard.

Writing is all about telling and sharing stories. I have lots—both imagined and true—longing to be told and shared.

Faye de Jesus lives in Quezon City, but considers Cagayan de Oro City her “hometown” having been there a gazillion times for work and leisure. As a corporate communications professional, Faye has written about high-voltage lines, towers, transformers, and substations on a daily basis for the past nine years. Random blogging and writing about other things—like food, travel, and angsty love poems—keep her sane. Off work, she’s busy campaigning for the abolition of skinny jeans, subjecting her hair to chemical abuse, doing Zen meditation, and scribbling obscure song lyrics and smiley faces on spiral notebooks.
 

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